Alzheimer’s Disease and Aluminum Absorption Risk

21 10 2015

Do processed and cooked foods have any connection to this disease?

Updated:  22 Oct 2015

Why is Alzheimer’s disease the 4th leading cause of death among our elderly, only behind heart disease, cancer and stroke? It also happens to be the 3d most common mineral element on the planet we’re exposed to with frequency.

The World Health Organization to include many other research teams has determined there’s a correlation with aluminum and elderly mental health risk and mortality.  “According to Washington DC’s Department of the Planet Earth, United States and Canadian regulatory agencies, acknowledges a potential risk factor in elderly cognitive impairment. It makes sense, research shows aluminum can produce toxic, oxidative stress in the brain and a brain autopsy study of elderly persons found them to have aluminum levels 20+ times higher than a middle-aged group” (Edward 2013).

But not all research institutions are on board with this cause and disease relationship. For instance, “People exposed to high levels of aluminum may develop Alzheimer’s disease, but other studies have not found this to be true. “We do not know for certain that aluminum causes Alzheimer’s disease.”  The ideal being the possibility those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or genetically predisposed to get it, have brain tissue that absorbs and stores more aluminum to greater degree than others when exposed” (ATSDR 2008).

However it is certain “eating large amounts of processed food containing aluminum additives or frequently cooking acidic foods in aluminum pots may expose a person to higher levels of aluminum than a person who generally consumes unprocessed foods and uses pots made of other materials (e.g., stainless steel or glass). The consensus of this particular study finds aluminum levels found in processed foods and foods cooked in aluminum pots are generally considered to be safe” (ATSDR 2008).

Aluminum is so common within our consumer products it’s also found in city water and everyday hygiene and beauty products.

Other research shows us you are 3 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s through the use of arousal anti perspirants and hair spray containing aluminum.  Both entrants into the body are absorbed easily through consumption and may be easily absorbed by the brain through the nasal cavity (Public health reports, Natural health, University of California, Berkeley Wellness Letter).

Aluminum cookware such as pans, pots and thermal beverage holders present absorption of mineral risk into foods. And for a pan lined with a Teflon nonstick surfaces this may present a separate health risk concern. It is suggested by consumer safety advocates Teflon may present health risk. However, M3 and DuPont research, show no conclusive proof that Teflon puts your health at risk.

Cookware sealants became a consumer health issue because 3rd party research shows when you get into varying chemical sealant composites to bind-bond-seal the aluminum or copper cookware as “THE” protective “HEAT” barrier may present other known & unknown health risks.  ‘To minimize the amount of aluminum that dissolves into your food from cookware, avoid cooking acidic foods like tomatoes and rhubarb in aluminum pans. Don’t store leftovers in aluminum, because the longer the food sits, the more aluminum it can absorb from the pan. Since more aluminum will dissolve out of old, pitted and worn pans, throw away your aging aluminum cookware. When you replace your old pans, consider upgrading to anodized aluminum pans” (LivingStrong 2015).

With regard to city treatment of drinking water how does one find out “how much” alum, or aluminum sulfate is added to our water?  The amount necessary to reduce algae and turbidity creating crystal clear drinking water from our city utilities dictates the amount of aluminum sulfate required.  If you drink city water, you are ingesting alum.  Due to the unanswered link between Alzheimer’s and aluminum, (some scientists) are urging water treatment facilities use ferric sulfate, or calcium as opposed to aluminum sulfate to accomplish the job. Call your city treatment facility, or water provider how they treat the water source.

Aluminum is also an occupational hazard, “Exposure to aluminum, unfortunately, is common with some occupations like mining, factory work, and welding. Welding can be especially worrisome because it produces vapors that, when inhaled, send aluminum directly into the lungs in a “super absorption” status where it is released to the blood and distributed to the bones and brain. Researchers have repeatedly examined the consequence of inhaling aluminum vapors and the results are grim” (Edward 2013).

Recommendations,

  1. Medical research correlation between Alzheimer’s disease and aluminum is so convincing a prudent person would remove “all” aerosol or cosmetics to include deodorants made of, or containing aluminum.
  2. If you see the word alum (aluminum), on any consumer product, or consumable in aluminum container or cookware, seriously consider an alternative.
  3. If you drink beverages made from aluminum cans, it would be prudent to switch to glass bottled or other container type.
  4. The greatest risk of aluminum exposure at a super absorption rate is an occupational hazard where inhaling vapors presents a serious health risk potential. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should always be worn during working with or around aluminum vapors and where PPE is inspected with frequency for breach or defects per manufacturer safety use instructions and inspection standards.
  5. Contact your local municipality and ask about aluminum sulfate in your drinking water and do check the bottled water to see if it’s simply bottled city or natural spring water with alum.

Reference,

ATSDR. Health Statement for Aluminum. September 2008. Agency for toxic substances and disease registry.

Edward Dr. Why I’m Concerned about the Dangers of Aluminum. 17 July 2013.  GHC (Global Healing Center).

Webber, Vallery.  Health Risks of Cooking Aluminum. Last Updated: 6 May 2015. LivingStrong.

Author: Marc T. Woodard, MBA, BS Exercise Science. Original 2008 Copyright updated 22 Oct 2015.  All rights reserved, Mirror Athlete Publishing @ www.mirrorathlete.com, Sign up for FREE Monthly eNewsletter.



 

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