Energy Drinks, Health Risk and Death Connection

14 05 2020

Updated: 14 May 2020, by Marc Woodard

So what energy, soda or caffeinated drink and in what volume is considered safe?

The following recommendations for caffeine ingestion vary, but a good average across the board looks to be: adults can consume around 400mg/day of caffeine, pregnant women should stay below 300mg/day. A five-year old child should consume no more than 1 soda/day at 45mg caffeine [at the most]. And if you include a caffeinated soda in a Childs daily diet, this would mean no chocolate, tea, or any other food source with caffeine in it.

“A five-year old child should consume no more than 1 soda/day at 45mg caffeine [at the most]. …” Or one cup of chocolate.

As a point of reference, 1 energy drink does not equate to an 8oz cup of coffee (130mg/cup). One energy drink for example can have the equivalence of several cups of coffee!

Energy drinks flooded the marketplace over a decade ago, with ever increasing popularity within the teenage demographic. Within youth sports for example, energy drinks seem to be the rage and norm… because of the quick boost one receives before exercise activities… and employee’s become dependent on the drinks to accomplish work.

So what’s the bottom line on health risk? Here’s just a few updated citations I found recently on the Internet.

Ageless MirrorAthlete reveals the hard to find consumer safety issues of the day. Also, learn how to live the lifestyle you need, want and deserve now! Simply click on the book banner to preview the book on Amazon.

“Energy drinks ‘can be dangerous because large amounts of caffeine may cause serious heart rhythm, blood flow and blood pressure problems,’ the NIH (National Institution of Health) has warned.”

“Researchers with the American Heart Association have warned that energy drinks can be ‘life-threatening,’ especially for those already with high blood pressure or cardiac issues.”

“The drinks have led to death. E.g., In 2017, a South Carolina teenager died after consuming an excessive amount of caffeine in a short amount of time.”

“Children with still-developing cardiovascular and nervous systems are also at risk as caffeine could harm them. The American Academy of Pediatrics said children should “never” consume energy drinks.”

“‘These energy drinks – one of the biggest problems – is that we haven’t the faintest idea what’s in them,’ Dr. Steven Nissen, M.D. of Cleveland Clinic pointed out.” “The manufacturers of these drinks are not required, by law, to disclose the contents. Those who have performed independent analysis on them have learned, at least a few of the drinks, are just loaded with huge amounts of caffeine.”

We already know exercise increases heart rate and blood pressure. When Energy drinks are introduced into the circulatory system and one participates in sport activity your system becomes super revved. The problem is, if you have an undiagnosed health issue, where an increased surge in circulatory pressure could lead to a stroke or heart attack. This leads one to wonder – is there a connection between high-dose caffeination and teenage deaths on the football field?

In 2012, Swedish authorities warned and believed mixing energy drinks with alcohol and drinking energy drinks after exercise can cause death! There was no hard scientific evidence available then on that health risk connection. “We are going through the Autopsy reports… ” (Anders Glyn, of the Swedish National Food Administration). Dr. Dan Andersson of Stockholm’s South Hospital stated, “If you drink a lot of Red Bull, and you are dehydrated, and/or mix it with alcohol, it can be very dangerous.” There have been recent incidents where energy drinks mixed with alchohol

“Swedish authorities warned and believed mixing energy drinks with alcohol and drinking energy drinks after exercise can cause death!”

Back in 2012, within the United States there was a crack down on manufacturers and retailers who made and sold energy drinks with alcohol in it. The FDA sent warning letters to manufactures… banning specific types of energy and alcoholic drinks in several states because of overdoses.

“Tue 12 Jun 2018 at 1812 AEST | 2012 NZST It has been reported that a teenage girl in Sydney has died after drinking a cocktail of alcohol and energy drinks mixed according to a recipe she found online. It is still too early for doctors to say the exact cause of death, though mixing alcohol and energy drinks has been known to cause health problems and even death in the past. …”

There is “a growing concern over the potential connection of energy drinks, alcohol and teen sport deaths.”

READ OUR FULL ARTICLE WRITTEN ON TOPIC which provides poison control data and a growing concern over the potential connection of energy drinks, alcohol and teen sport deaths. Also, you’ll learn about other ingredients in energy drinks that the FDA does not require to be listed on consumer labels.

It’s what you don’t know about the chemical energy drinks that’s increasing children and adult health risk and cause of other illness and disease and shortened lifespans. And for this reason alone, stick to coffee, tea and decaffeinated drinks [if caffeine intolerant] and morning stretch exercises to wake up and get your day started. And remember… Too much chemical-stimulant-influence on the mind and body, in the long run is not a healthy habit for anyone.

Author: Marc T. Woodard, MBA, BS Exercise Science, ARNG, CPT, RET. 2012-20 Copyright. All rights reserved, Mirror Athlete Inc., http://www.mirrorathlete.com, Sign up for your Free eNewsletter.





Ageless MirrorAthlete Pacific Book Review by Allison Walker

8 03 2020

Updated: 8 March 2020, Marc Woodard

Learn More About Ageless MirrorAthlete book and the author by clicking on the book link and reading the free preview.

Title: Ageless Mirror Athlete: Overweight and Unfit No More Author: Marc T. Woodard Publisher: iUniverse ISBN: 978-1-5320-5373-3 Genre: Health and Fitness Pages: 367. Book can be ordered on Amazon, B&N and iUniverse: Hard and soft book cover and digital copy.

To view Ageless MirrorAthlete original pacific book review listed at their website [click here]

Pacific Book Review, by Allison Walker, June 2019

“The weight loss industry should be ashamed, opines lifestyle consultant and author Marc Woodard. Fad diets, the inundation of weight loss pills, and fitness equipment that sits in the corner gathering dust sells people gimmicks instead of solutions. Woodard’s book, Ageless Mirror Athlete, promises to expose the industry’s cheap secrets and offer readers a healthier way to live.”

“As a person looking to make a healthy lifestyle change, to lose weight or gain strength, maybe even to manage a disease, you are entrusting your lifestyle coach with not only your well-being, but with your life. Woodard knows this, is passionate about his job and it’s clear he holds equally high standards for others in his industry. This is why Woodard scorns the half-truths of weight loss products, and favors a more wholesome diet, regular exercise and good old fashioned calorie counting along with self-awareness. “

“Calorie counting, or at least awareness of caloric intake, is a key component of Woodard’s fitness plan. Understanding your body’s basal, resting and exercise metabolic rates is how Woodard’s clients lose weight safely, without sacrificing the foods they love. The book becomes technical, explaining the differences between carbohydrates, fats and protein; how the body utilizes each nutrient; and how to calculate how much of each you need. Thankfully, Woodard follows up with, You don’t have to finish reading to begin losing weight and feeling well right now. Instead, Woodard says, make a commitment to daily walking and minimizing processed foods. Ageless Mirror Athlete scorns fad diets in favor of this holistic, educated approach. As an example, Woodard points to high protein, high fat diets like Atkins and KETO. These diets work by throwing the body into a metabolic state of ketosis, wherein you lose weight very quickly but may suffer health complications with continued use. Woodard notes an extended state of ketosis may result in gout, kidney stones and kidney failure.”

“The Ageless Mirror Athlete plan focuses on habitual adjustment to daily routine, since unless you can maintain your lifestyle long-term, no diet or exercise plan is going to work for you. Instead of limiting the types of foods you eat, people learn a better awareness of the food being consumed, the quantity and their nutrient value. Exercise plans favor daily walks or bicycle rides. By making healthier lifestyle choices, clients have greater sustainable energy to get through their day. Woodard offers the example of a client, Sally, who was placed on a popular diet plan by a previous lifestyle coach. Sally was eating a high carbohydrate, low fat, low protein diet. At first she was able to meet her exercise goals, but eventually found she barely had energy to get through her work day, never mind spending energy working out. Under Woodard’s tutelage, they developed a more balanced diet plan to give Sally more energy, and an exercise program she was more easily able to commit to. Several months later, Sally lost weight and still practiced her healthy lifestyle.”

“Just as he promises, Woodard is the real deal. He promises to expose the truth behind the weight loss and body building industries, and he does. Ageless Mirror Athlete is a no-gimmicks call-out to all the diet plans, weight loss pills, and exercise equipment founded of false promises made by commercial interests.”